Ampicillin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium infections: clinical features, causal clades, and contribution of MALDI-TOF to early detection - Université Paris-Est-Créteil-Val-de-Marne Access content directly
Journal Articles Microbiology Spectrum Year : 2023

Ampicillin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium infections: clinical features, causal clades, and contribution of MALDI-TOF to early detection

Hélène Faury
  • Function : Author
Ronan Le Guen
  • Function : Author
Vanessa Demontant
  • Function : Author
Christophe Rodriguez
  • Function : Author
Bérénice Souhail
  • Function : Author
Adrien Galy
  • Function : Author
Sarah Jolivet
  • Function : Author
Raphaël Lepeule
  • Function : Author
Jean-Winoc Decousser
Vincent Fihman
  • Function : Author
Guilhem Royer

Abstract

ABSTRACT Enterococcus faecium, a common resident of the human gastrointestinal tract, is also a major pathogen. Prompt initiation of appropriate treatment is essential to improve patient outcome in disseminated E. faecium infections. However, ampicillin resistance is frequent in this species, rendering treatment difficult. We used a comprehensive approach, including clinical data review, whole-genome sequencing, and mass spectrometry, to characterize ampicillin-susceptible (EFM-S) and ampicillin-resistant (EFM-R) isolates. We included all patients with culture-confirmed E. faecium infection attending our hospital over a 16-month period. A comparison of 32 patients infected with EFM-S strains and 251 patients infected with EFM-R strains revealed that EFM-R isolates were strongly associated with a longer hospital stay, history of prior hospitalization, and the carriage of multidrug-resistant organisms. An analysis of the genomes of 26 EFM-S and 26 EFM-R isolates from paired patients revealed a population structure almost perfectly matching ampicillin susceptibility, with resistant isolates in clade A1, and susceptible isolates in clades A2 and B. The clade B and A2 isolates mostly came from digestive or biliary tract samples, whereas clade A1 isolates were mostly obtained from urine and blood. Finally, we built a custom database for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), which differentiated between clade B and clade A1/A2 strains with high-positive and high-negative predictive values (95.6% and 100%, respectively). This study provides important new insight into the clinical features and clades associated with EFM-S and EFM-R isolates. In combination with MALDI-TOF MS, these data could facilitate the rapid initiation of the most appropriate treatment. IMPORTANCE Enterococcus faecium is an important human pathogen in which the prevalence of ampicillin resistance is high. However, little is known about the clinical characteristics of patients infected with ampicillin-resistant and ampicillin-susceptible strains. Indeed, current knowledge is based on genus-wide studies of Enterococcus or studies of very small numbers of susceptible isolates, precluding robust conclusions. Our data highlight specific clinical features related to the epidemiology of EFM-S and EFM-R strains, such as length of hospital stay, history of prior hospitalization, carriage of multidrug-resistant organisms, and type of sample from which the isolate was obtained. The use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with a custom-built database may make it possible to distinguish clade B isolates, which are typically susceptible to ampicillin, from clade A1/A2 isolates (A1 being typically resistant), thereby facilitating the management of these infections.

Dates and versions

hal-04297787 , version 1 (21-11-2023)

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Hélène Faury, Ronan Le Guen, Vanessa Demontant, Christophe Rodriguez, Bérénice Souhail, et al.. Ampicillin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium infections: clinical features, causal clades, and contribution of MALDI-TOF to early detection. Microbiology Spectrum, 2023, 11 (5), ⟨10.1128/spectrum.04545-22⟩. ⟨hal-04297787⟩
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